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Rhythm Garden

Curated by Alan Prazniak

185 Varick Street

June 13 – July 19, 2019

An installation image of the exhibition "Rhythm Garden" at Geary.

Rhythm Garden, 2019, Installation image

An installation image of the exhibition "Rhythm Garden" at Geary.

Rhythm Garden, 2019, Installation image

An installation image of the exhibition "Rhythm Garden" at Geary.

Rhythm Garden, 2019, Installation image

An installation image of the exhibition "Rhythm Garden" at Geary.

Rhythm Garden, 2019, Installation image

An installation image of the exhibition "Rhythm Garden" at Geary.

Rhythm Garden, 2019, Installation image

A painting by Clark Filio.

Clark Filio

Untitled, 2019

Oil on canvas

24h x 18w in

A painting by Erika Hickle with ants and lips.

Erika Hickle

Eat Me, 2019

Oil and acrylic on canvas

60h x 60w in

A painting by Sean Marley.

Sean Marley

Knight, 2017

Acrylic on canvas

10h x 8w in

A diptych painting by Steven Mayer.

Steven Mayer

Sughaim Sine, 2019

Acrylic and medium on panel

11 x 14 in. each

 

A work by Naomi Nakazato.

Naomi Nakazato

The April Letter, 2019

Acrylic and vinyl on canvas, panel

36h x 24w in

A painting by Pareesa Pourian.

Pareesa Pourian

Night Floor, 2016

Oil on canvas

10h x 8w in

A painting by Chris Camperchioli.

Chris Camperchioli

It's Butterflies All the Way Down, 2019

Acrylic on canvas

48h x 36.25w in

A painting of cats by Hannah Cosac Naify.

Hannah Cosac Naify

Untitled, 2019

Oil on canvas

46h x 42w in

A painting by S.E. Benezra.

S.E. Benezra

Birth of a Star, 2018

Oil and acrylic on canvas

30h x 40w in

Rhythm Garden

Press Release

Hannah Cosac Naify, Chris Camperchioli, Pareesa Pourian, Naomi Nakazato, Steven Mayer, Sean Marley, Erika Hickle, S.E. Benezra, Clark Filio, Curated by Alan Prazniak

 

 

From beyond history, at every turn towards civilization, gardens and art have intertwined. Edible roots and clay bowls mutated into hanging gardens and tapestries, and as they’ve become aestheticized existential questions arise.

At the beginning, where do we start? At the end, what does it mean? And in the middle, what is it for, knowing the gardening will never end?

 

 

I’ve brought together nine artists who ask themselves these questions as they tend to their work intimately with depth of purpose. With odd mannerisms and a visible rigor, they unearth more questions than answers. However, the spaces they provide are contemplative, and their proud selfhood reminds us that a painter’s solitude can be welcoming, and that wandering thoughts are pleasant.

 

 

There are many types of gardener and it seems that each has an analog in painting; The composer, the collector, the farmer. The witch, the thief, and the monk.  I guess that makes me the curator, and, as Spring comes to an end, I’d like to invite you to my garden.